Fear Of A Muslim Island

Muslim man, Buddhist elephant (insomuch as that is possible).


Muslims can’t catch a break. Publicly discriminated against in America, bombed or oppressed in the Middle East, and feared in Europe. Even in Sri Lanka, can’t catch a break. In the East, I’ve met Tamils who’ve said they’d rather sell their land to a Sinhalese than a Muslim, and when a candidate there tried to get Muslims and Tamils to run on the same platform, it was trouble. In Colombo – a majority minority city – Muslims growing public face has also led to resentment. So much so that now, in Dambulla, ‘Buddhist’ protesters seem to have succeeded in closing a 50 year old mosque.

It’s a shame. If you visit the Gangaramaya Temple (the part in the Beira Lake) the plaque says it was built by Moosajees, who I presume are Muslim. On the thousand rupee note (unless you get a Mahinda) there’s an elephant with a mahout looking fellow. That man is Umar Lebbai Panicker, a Muslim from Eravur who donated the tusker to the Dalada Maligawa temple.

Muslims are Sri Lankans. They are neighbors and friends. Yet today they are an ethnic minority which, while on the rise economically, is viewed with suspicion by many. Not that Muslims don’t have problems. First off, Y U SPILL WATER ALL OVER THE BATHROOM. Foot washing has a time and a place, and it’s not in the office bathroom. That used to be my major issue. More seriously, in the East people seemed to have issues with Muslims lending money and fertilizer to Tamil farmers and then repossessing the land if the harvest didn’t come in. Or, in Jaffna, with Muslims from outside setting up shops. Neither of these are bad things per se, but it shows the conflicts between Muslims and Tamils.

In the south, one major issue has been loudspeakers. Muslims started doing the call to prayer over loudspeakers and Buddhists retaliated with all night electric pirith and things really got out of control. Then there are the nagging cultural issues. The rising number of women in full hijab (also known as full ninja, perhaps offensively), a visible sign of Wahabbi influence, and a sort of checking out of the community at large. I’m friends with a lot of secularish Muslims, but many Muslims really keep to their own community, which can lead to misunderstanding. I mean, try dating a Muslim girl. Well, you can date a Muslim girl perhaps, but try marrying one. Doesn’t happen, least not without converting, and penis mutilation.

That said, it is important to remember that all communities have our problems if you look at them close enough. I’d venture to say that these are human failings common to us all, manifested in different cultural ways. What discomfits me about the recent protests and mosque closing in Dambulla is A) that it happened B) that this push against public Islam seems sanctioned from the top and C) that it’s brought out a lot of bad blood against Muslim Sri Lankans. I do think the mosque should have stayed open, as it has been for 50 years. When I was at my most Buddhist (in terms of practice) I was in Canada and I found shelter and community among many other religions. Mainly Jewish places, but that was just Montreal. My experience of faith is that I find much more common in spirit with other religious communities than I do to divide.

But this isn’t a religious issue, really. Islam and Sri Lankan Buddhism are often more cultural markers than religious. Still, I think we’ve tread the path of ethnic division before, and IT’S NOT A GOOD IDEA. Thus far, Muslims are the only major community to not stage a violent insurrection, so we should A) give them some respect and B) keep it that way (tho I reject the argument that violence is ever justified by X, I’m just saying). Muslims are the only community that’s widely trilingual, that generally minds their biz, and they’re a credit and boon to Sri Lanka. They’re also my friends and neighbors, so all the hating is really uncouth and uncool.

Seriously people, this is a small island and we all have to live together. Forget the culture conflicts and petty annoyances, Muslims are friends and neighbors and they deserve to be treated the way, what’s the golden rule, do onto Muslims as you would have done onto youse. Would you be happy if your 50 year old temple or church was demolished, especially after a mob prevented you from going in and praying? I think not. Whatever the specifics of the case, it is damn important to emphasize that the Sri Lankan Muslim community is a vital part of Sri Lanka, a respected part of Sri Lanka, and, ultimately, family.

I’m sorry about the Dambulla thing. I hope we’re still cool.

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126 Comments »

2012-04-24 15:12:27

Yesterday I went to Unity to buy something and the storeperson was like: “Are you Muslim?” I said No. “Tamil?” Then: “Urghh. Sinhala.”
Many of my best friends are Muslim. However there are those who shove shit in your face if you’re not a Muslim or a Tamil, especially around Bamba or Kollutpitiya. Our communities are different, and our religions are worlds apart, but in the end we’re all human beings; BOTH sides need to understand this and treat each other with the respect they offer to everyone else. Just because you’re Muslim (or from the other perspective, Sinhala) doesn’t make you something the cat dragged in. I often get the view that many Muslims view Buddhists as godless freeroamers who just happen to make up the majority of the island.

I agree with you on the mosque thing, which was frankly stupid.

rajivmw
2012-04-24 17:43:52

I have never ever had shit shoved in my face for being Sinhalese except at foreign airports.

chandani
2012-04-26 00:31:25

Youve obviously then never been shopping in pettah. bamba or kollupitiya.

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shammi
2012-04-26 19:04:00

Actually I’ve found Muslim and Tamil shop keepers infinitely more helpful than Sinhalese. What kind of shops are you refering to?

 
dingiri
2012-04-30 20:17:50

PLUS.. I dont think they are stupid enough to discourage 73% of the populace from purchasing their goods.

 
 
 
 
2012-04-24 15:21:39

“I’m sorry about the Dambulla thing. I hope we’re still cool.”
I’ll drink to that! Hopefully non alcoholic stuff. :)

 
Dee
2012-04-24 15:43:19

Good post Indi… This incident was SO stupid.. don’t those priests have bigger fish to fry?? Try going out of the temple and doing something worthwhile for the community for once…Geez…(NOT generalizing all priests though..)
50 years is a long time for an establishment… even so any conflict should have been fixed in a TRANSPARENT manner PLUS LEGALLY..sigh… well what can you expect from a country where there are absolutely no answers to anything fishy!!!

dingiri
2012-04-30 20:19:35

You have to generalise to all priests. Not one spoke out against the foul mouthed bully.

 
 
2012-04-24 17:18:24

There are some problems regarding muslims Mr indi.
1.There culture doesn’t match Sinhala culture.
2.They have invaded our market.
4.They are richer than us(Either in right or wrong way) >>>> which leads to jealousy.
5.They have invaded our lands; mostly because of idiotic 99yr lease method.
6.They have invaded our historical places >>> Kuragala, Dewanagala and many more.
7.They are cunning in marketing as gifted genetically.

I don’t like to a war,
but please remember that they are not same as us,
they won’t stop if one thing goes wrong for them,
because they are taught to fight from there religion.

I don’t see a answer to this problem,
the only answer is stopping their tough blind useless laws,
but it won’t happen.

2012-04-25 09:35:54

Aside from the stupid and bigoted (not to mention inaccurate) seven points of yours, what do you mean by “their tough blind useless laws”? There are no Muslim laws in SL. There are many Buddhist laws, however, such as banning the sale of fresh meat and alcohol on Poya Days. Shouldn’t we first stop these silly and hypocritical laws?

2012-04-25 10:48:05

I’m assuming it refers to Sharia law and the generally rigid dictates contained in the Koran which to be honest are quite intolerant and somewhat militant. Christians have outgrown and disregarded the violent teachings in the Bible, especially the rantings in the Old Testament like stoning people to death, killing witches and homosexuals. But not so among the Muslim community who largely still believe that every single thing written in the Koran is the actual literal word of God including all the violent and militant ones that just do no fit into a modern society. This is the problem, and we can see very clearly the growing influence of conservative/extremist interpretation of Islam in Sri Lanka. There is Muslim personal law in Sri Lanka however which is based on Sharia, and unfortunately some people from the Sri Lankan Muslim community actually want full on Sharia law introduced (stoning to death people, chopping off their hands, whipping etc). There are no “Buddhist laws” – what does that mean, is there Buddhist scriptural support for banning sale of meat and alcohol on Poya days? Looks more like the State trying to win religious votes. The vast majority of laws in Sri Lanka are a mish mash of Dutch and British law which many Christians will argue actually have a Judeo Christian basis, which includes democracy and the rights of the individual.

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2012-04-25 14:42:56

What is this “Muslim personal law”, you mention? If you mean laws that one sets for oneself, then it’s no one’s business but one’s own.

There may be nutjobs who want Sharia law for all, and there are nutjobs that believe Buddhism must be given the foremost place; but whatever they want is only relevant if it is actually in law. Sharia law is not part of the SL system of law, so bringing it up in this discussion is stupid.

I didn’t say that these Buddhist laws have a basis in Buddhist teachings or scripture; and they don’t have to be to be termed Buddhist laws. Making women wear hijab isn’t in the Koran either, but it is still a Muslim law in many countries. I’m sure that the state is trying to play the religious card. That is exactly the point. It is pandering to a certain bloc by favouring what is believed to be the teachings of that religion.

Dutch and British law has elements of several religions (Christian, Roman, Greek, etc), but none of the laws that were based purely on a religious teaching (illegality of adultery, witchcraft, homosexuality, etc) have been dropped. Democracy and the rights of the individual are hardly Christian sentiments, and in fact come more out of Greek philosophy. Even if it did have a Christian background, the point isn’t to remove anything flavoured by religion, but to remove that which has no purpose beyond religiosity.

Thanks for bringing up these points, since it allows us to look at them in detail and rubbish a lot of these assumptions (eg: SL has Muslim laws, SL has no Buddhist laws, etc).

 
2012-04-25 14:47:10

*Sorry, that should read “but the laws that were based purely on a religious teaching (illegality of adultery, witchcraft, homosexuality, etc) have been dropped.”

 
2012-04-25 15:33:15

This is the Muslim Personal Law I refer to:

http://issues.lines-magazine.org/Art_Aug03/Chulani.htm

“While there have been considerable reform of particularly the General law in Sri Lanka to ensure equality for women, certain aspects of the Muslim Personal law (MPL) continue to discriminate against women. Attempts at legislative reform of Muslim law have been unsuccessful due to a growing Muslim lobby which has preferred to see reform as an interference with the religious identity of the Muslim community and an attempt to tinker with the word of God.”

And sorry, whatever the Muslim “nutjobs” want is already there on the ground in law:

Qazi courts to be established in Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka’s Ministry of Justice has taken measures to establish 58 Qazi courts in the country’s Muslim dominated areas. The courts headed by judges known as Qazis will render their verdicts according to the Sharia Law, mostly to settle family disputes of Muslim people.

http://www.colombopage.com/archive_10B/Sep10_1284127141CH.php

So no, you are wrong Sharia law IS a part of the SL system of law.

And yes it is good to bring these issues out in the open, so people like you who are ignorant of the real facts will have their eyes opened.

 
2012-04-25 15:38:22

“Making women wear hijab isn’t in the Koran either”

According to you. Many Muslims would disagree. For example:

Hijab In The Al-Quran And Sunnah

The Requirements of Women’s Hijab in Accordance with the Qur’an, the Authentic Sunnah and the Practice of the Pious Predecessors.

http://islamic-world.net/sister/hijab_in_quran.htm

 
Hash
2012-04-25 17:00:49

Shariah law you say?

So we are forgetting where some of the modern banking methods, law and trade practices come from? If it benefits us then we just grab the bit of law from Shariah and mould it to our own, but if not bring hell fire down to the bits that we don’t agree with?

I’m not saying that the Islamic law implemented and practiced and implemented in sri lanka is corrupt. It is very. Most of it doesn’t make sense, and is fabricated and made in favour to the so called “religious leaders” and often made by them. Yes , this needs to be fixed – but not buy other religious groups coming and telling them what to do.

It’s a shame. I’m a Muslim, and I love Sri Lanka. I want it to be that way. I want to be the neutral minority every one loved to hangout with. I hope this doesnt change.

 
2012-04-25 17:09:54

Exactly which modern banking methods, law and trade practices come from Shariah?

 
2012-04-26 10:25:45

Er… hello? Muslim Personal Law affects only Muslims, and only if they wish to submit to them. The same goes for these Qazi courts you refer to (have those even been officially set up yet?). When you say that Shariah Law is part of SL’s system of law, it gives the impression that it has the same status as Ditch or British Law, and that it is imposed on other religions too. If this wasn’t your intention, then it is an irrelevant argument since we are discussing discrimination here. SL also has Thesavalamai Law, Kandyan Law, and various other such systems that only affect those groups.

Try not to be so intellectually deceitful in your arguments. How does Muslim Personal Law discriminate against non-Muslims?

In contrast, Buddhist laws such as those banning fresh meat and alcohol on Poya Days is discriminatory against other faiths.

“Many Muslims would disagree”

And many would agree with me: “The Burqa is not explicitly prescribed in the Muslim holy texts. The Qur’an offers guidelines for modesty that are open to interpretation by different Muslim traditions. The Hadith—a guide to practical observance comparable to the Jewish Talmud—is more specific, suggesting that women “veil” their faces, necks and breasts once puberty is reached.”http://www.mahalo.com/burqa/

“And yes it is good to bring these issues out in the open, so people like you who are ignorant of the real facts will have their eyes opened.”

Opened to what; that Islam is a bit archaic and hasn’t allowed for secularism? We already know that. But the debate is whether it is correct to discriminate against a particular religion simply because you disagree with it. So far, you have been unable to show us any reason to believe that Islam isn’t any more evil than Buddhism as it is practiced in SL.

 
2012-04-26 13:36:43

LOL David,

It’s pretty clear you were totally clueless about the existence of Muslim Personal Law in Sri Lanka. Well guess what? It does exist. And as I understand you don’t get to “choose” if both parties to a dispute are Muslims.

You stated “Sharia law is not part of the SL system of law, so bringing it up in this discussion is stupid.”But you are wrong. Sharia law is a part of the SL system of law and sanctioned by the government of Sri Lanka as shown above. You seem to be making the assertion that it is not part of Sri Lankan law – rubbish. Qazi courts are straight out of Islamic jurisprudence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qadi

If you follow the thread of this discussion nothing in the above is “irrelevant” even though you may be desperate for it to be so. I very clearly stated that “There is Muslim personal law in Sri Lanka however which is based on Sharia,”and you disputed this and I have merely put forward the evidence to support my claims. I can’t help it if you were shown up in the process, sorry.

There are many teachings in Islam that are inherently evil and most of them are found in the Koran itself, which is the foundation of Islam as a religion:

http://skepticsannotatedbible.com/quran/cruelty/long.html

http://skepticsannotatedbible.com/quran/int/long.html

 
2012-04-28 21:52:36

“It’s pretty clear you were totally clueless about the existence of Muslim Personal Law in Sri Lanka. Well guess what? It does exist. And as I understand you don’t get to “choose” if both parties to a dispute are Muslims.”

Actually what I was clueless about was Muslim Personal Law applying to anyone but Muslims. It doesn’t, and therefore cannot be said to be discriminatory.

“But you are wrong. Sharia law is a part of the SL system of law and sanctioned by the government of Sri Lanka as shown above.”

I am a Sri Lankan, and therefore if Sharia Law is part of SL’s judicial system it should apply to me too. But it doesn’t. It’s a specific system for a specific group, and doesn’t apply to others, nor discriminate against non-Muslims, unlike Buddhist laws. So yes, in the context of a discussion on religious discrimination it is irrelevant.

“I very clearly stated that “There is Muslim personal law in Sri Lanka however which is based on Sharia,””

And I asked you several times what relevance that has to the discussion on religious intolerance in Dambulla and religious discrimination in general. I can’t help it if you want to avoid the forest by focusing on a tree.

“There are many teachings in Islam that are inherently evil and most of them are found in the Koran itself, which is the foundation of Islam as a religion:”

There are teachings in many religions that seem evil, stupid, or simply pointless. Some might say that religion itself is all of the above. But what has that to do with religious intolerance in SL?

 
 
monara1
2012-04-27 13:25:58

aptly said Mr Blacker…kudos

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dingiri
2012-04-30 20:35:23

As I suspected, this is about business and not Buddhism. So if someone is better than you at something the answer is to attack him rather than try to emulate him? We saw the same behaviour in July 83. And look what happened. If the sinhala businessmen were more hardworking and sold good quality stuff and low prices they will obviously attract business from other sinhalese.

Kuragala has been a Sufi Moslem shrine for over a hundred years. There is an old stupa about 10 foot high some distance away from it but there wasnt even a pansala when I visited it a few years ago. The moslems have not harmed it or defaced it contrary to what the priest says in the video clip. So what is preventing Buddhists from worshipping it if they want to? The moslems have built a road and flight of steps all the way upto it. Buddhists should make use of it rather than view it as another blow against buddhism.

These rabble rousers have all the hall marks of the anti Jewish hate mongers in Nazi Germany. I only hope they dont take Sri Lanka along the same path that Hitler took Germany.

But thanks for admitting that you are riven by jelousy. It is the default emotion among many Sri Lankans. Which is why we are still a hopelessly indebted third world country that has done little for it self.

 
 
SarongJohnnie
2012-04-24 17:37:58

Electric Pirith. Good name for a band.

Tharindu
2012-04-28 00:06:25

Ditto that

shammi
2012-04-28 16:22:32

Yeah, and the band would get a lot of free publicity from subsequent protests against it. Remember Gayan Perera’s song with pirith chanting in the background? (Though I did wonder whether it was just a little publicity stunt engineered by the little rascal himelf. :D)

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Chathura
2012-04-24 17:38:27

1. Isn’t that true the removed Mosque built in a reserved area which was belong to the Buddhist temple Rangiri Dambulla ?

2. And about the 1000 Rs note. as I have heard the Ummair Lebbe the Muslim person captured the baby Elephant and sold to Tikiri Banda Manampitiya Dissawe in 1937. and then it was donated to Daladha Maligawa. ref : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raja_(elephant)

3. Also I have heard many of times when founding some old remains from muslim villages which related ancient cities it’s more like to getting them ruined.

4. I have recently travelled in eastern province in 2010. specially in pothuwil. the worst thing there was the Muslim people are directly involving with offensive the buddhist cultural icons. what I have heard through internet about muhudu maha wiharaya also was true. there have been many of attempts to getting in to the Reserved area and build a mosque inside the land belong to the temple. none of action has taken when complaining to the police. but now the things getting better there.

5. Anyway I agree that there an attempt to start another trouble here in sri lanka. this time between muslims – and sinhaleee.

 
????? ????????
2012-04-24 19:26:56

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???????? ????? ???? ??????? ???? ??????????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ??????????????.???????? ???????? ??? ????? ?????? ?? ???.???? ????????? ????? ??????.????? ??????? ??? ??? ?????? ???.?? ???? ??? ??? ????? ?? ??? ???????? ??? ???????? ??????.

2012-04-25 11:20:28

Sinhala script is not supported on this blog unfortunately.

 
 
Sri Lankan
2012-04-24 20:57:51

There is definitely more and more Wahabbi influence in Sri Lanka.

Muslim population growth is arguably faster than other communities.

Muslims don’t want to go against the ways and means of the community, even if they want to. Because they loose the benefits of belonging to the community. For example, their business success depends on the community support. This is similar to ragging in universities. Students who don’t like ragging still want benefits like “kuppi” and other study supports offered by the well organized “system” – a mafia – so they tolerate ragging and other oddities of the system.

In short, the Muslim community system is made to prevail. Either you accept its ways and means and belong to it and reap the benefits. Or get out of it and do on your own, which is pretty much impossible for someone to do business that easily at small and medium scale.

And finally, it’s the population that matters when it comes to voting. A growing, Wahabbi influenced community, with a very strong binding force among its members, voting the leaders of the country sounds the scariest thing to me. It’s like using democracy to get rid of democracy, ironically.

Yes, the population growth point is arguable, but everywhere I read and see points to it than otherwise.

N.B. This comment doesn’t apply to most of the Muslim friends I associate, and probably those who comment in this and other similar articles here.

KP
2012-04-27 01:40:09

8% of the total polpulation of which only a couple thousand are actually Wahhabi followers.

Damn, I think i just crapped my pants in fear.

 
 
jay
2012-04-24 20:59:06

Muslims do do their share of discrimination… I was born a muslim (long since lapsed and now a militant atheist) married to a Sinhalese buddists and trust me, I have had my share of discriminatory bullcrap from these thambi muslims.

Case in point – there was a point where my wife and I were looking for a place to rent.. and we found a place that was good on paper… and the person I talked to was very warm and nice and insisted that I come take a look at the place. When I got there he confided that he would only like to give this place to a muslim…when I told him that the only thing that was muslim about me is my name and mentioned my wife was no where even close to that, the whole thing became very uncomfortable. The house didn’t turn out to be that great in the end – but even if it was perfect, I somehow doubt I would have been considered a suitable tenant. Everyone knows when it comes to land and property and muslims selling it, they would only sell it to their own.

I could also tell you a time when I was interviewed at a multi national operating in SL in Nawan mw and the guy who interviewed me told me that he recommended that I be given the job – because, hey, I was Muslim and so was he (he told me over the phone call when I called back to say I was not going to take it because the salary was less than I expected).

I personally know the former HR director of a large hotel chain who told me when it was time for him to resign the board asked to name his successor and the next in line was a muslim and he was hesitant to recommend. This was not because he was a racist (I’ve known him for a long time and he’s anything but) but he rightfully feared if he did, within a few years there was sure to be an unbalance – and he didn’t want the place he helped build for 30 years to go down that road.

Did you ever think why the muslims are feared in europe? It’s not an accident. Muslims somehow believe that they are special and therefore normal rules that apply to other people don’t apply to them. My wife works for a large multi national … and in the committee that oversees the catered food. They have a huge issue that a few muslims (less than 80 out of almost 600 people) make such a huge fuss because some of the others would like the occasional pork curry served at the cafeteria. Obviously, they expect everyone to be sensitive to their needs – the feelings and the needs of the others can take the back seat as t hey long as they get theirs.

Each day when I go out on the road, I see these bloody women covered from head to toe in black garb walking around like bloody ghosts. This phenomenon is something new to this country (it certainly was not there when I was growing up in the 80s) – exported by a bunch of wahabi assholes who are trying to radicalize the muslims – esp of the eastern province origin who seems be have infested colombo of late. There is gong to be conflict – and it’s going to be between the singhalese and the muslims. Both sides are to blame – but the muslims have done their share of harm and then some.

Mark my words.

Sri Lankan
2012-04-25 09:58:28

Consider them marked. Seriously.

 
2012-04-25 13:45:01

“I personally know the former HR director of a large hotel chain who told me when it was time for him to resign the board asked to name his successor and the next in line was a muslim and he was hesitant to recommend. This was not because he was a racist (I’ve known him for a long time and he’s anything but) but he rightfully feared if he did, within a few years there was sure to be an unbalance – and he didn’t want the place he helped build for 30 years to go down that road.”

Its a side issue, but this is rather tricky.

It was not the subordinate that he feared. However he felt that he may favour Muslims. Was that fear justified? Even if it was, was he justified in overlooking the most suitable candidate, and therefore discriminating against him?

 
 
sandun
2012-04-24 21:47:05

The muslim community prosper because they do tend to favour those of their own faith and they as a majority like to do business (as opposed to the doct0r, lawyer, engineer, accountant career choice of the other communities which do not pay as relatively well in SL). They give jobs to each other, give financial support, tend to go out together for the most part and inter marry. Doing business is difficult with muslims unless you are buying from them. They do give good service when you buy. But try selling anything to them and they will not buy from a Sinhalese unless they have no other choice. Im not generalising. This is applicable in almost all cases. They, as a people, are generally friendly and approachable which helps in business. They control votes by moving into areas and multiplying their numbers with high birth rates. Of course none of this is wrong. This community model obviously works well. Other communities should emulate it and they too will propser like our muslim friends. That being said, getting rid of the burkha/full ninja outfit would be cool (no pun). Making a women invisible is something only a jealous husband or boy friend or insanely protective father would want. If the muslim women are forced to wear it so should those muslim men who chase skirt like there is no tomorrow.

 
 
2012-04-25 03:35:16

[...] Indi.ca, who has covered the news extensively, comments: Muslims are Sri Lankans. They are neighbors and friends. Yet today they are an ethnic minority which, while on the rise economically, is viewed with suspicion by many. [..] [...]

 
2012-04-25 06:59:22

[...] Indi.ca, who has covered the news extensively, comments: Muslims are Sri Lankans. They are neighbors and friends. Yet today they are an ethnic minority which, while on the rise economically, is viewed with suspicion by many. [..] [...]

 
okay
2012-04-25 08:38:21

Wow!,
Some of the comments here lambasting the muslims here are scary!.

Why do we have issues with what people wear?.
If they want to cover themselves head to toe, why do we let it bother us?.
Are we all supposed to wear the same, and look the same?, is that how living in ‘harmony’ would work?.

Grow up!

2012-04-25 11:09:22

i dont know about you but it is a form of cultural apartheid and a loud declaration that screams I Am Muslim. It is certainly nothing like wearing a Christian cross on a chain or wearing pirith nool as Buddhists do. The black Burkha is quite in-your-face and can be very disconcerting. how is this: http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/image/33986-16×9-340×191.jpg considered even remotely “normal”? Does it feel natural/normal talking to a person whose face is hidden by a Burkha? If we have an issue with naked people walking around as they wish, why should we not have a problem with ppl covering themselves up like this and hiding their identity in a public place? how do you address security concerns? How do you identify people on security cameras? Are doctors to examine Burkha clad woman like it is done in some Muslim countries – through a hole in the wall? Also how do you know the woman is willingly wearing the Burkha and not forced to by her husband or society? Doesn’t the burkha and hijab separate school children into two distinct camps – Muslim and non-Muslim?

You ask “Are we all supposed to wear the same, and look the same?” but isn’t that exactly what Islamic law and their supporters are setting out to do? All the women should be covered from head to toe in a monocolour burka except inside the house and all the men should grow their beards, wear a skull cap and those flowing shalwar kameezs, only men are allowed in the Mosques for prayers and women have to be happy praying at home. isnt that the very opposite of promoting diversity?

2012-04-25 15:08:36

Firstly, most of your pseudo-concerns are very similar or even identical to those made against the Jews in the first half of the 20th century — they look and dress differently (beards, plaits, funny clothes), they are a security risk (talk a language we don’t understand), etc. If the burka is disconcerting to you, that is your problem; just as if you find a woman in a mini skirt sexually distracting. Deal with your issues yourself.

Wherever security requires a face to be revealed, there are clear instructions to do so. If you step up to an ATM, you will be instructed to remove headwear and sunglasses (presumably this applies to burkhas too). The same goes for anyone having a visa, passport, or ID picture taken. So does that mean that your cap or sunglasses are a security risk? Lol. If they want to be examined by blindfolded doctors or whatever, that’s their own business and not yours or the state’s.

It is ridiculous to try to interlink a subjective moral position with that of the law. We have the same misfit when it comes to abortion laws and stem cell research. If a religion discriminates against a section of its own followers, that segment must decide for themselves whether they wish to continue being a part of that faith or not, or whether they want to leave it, reform it, or whatever. The law cannot dictate how that religion must be followed as long as its believers are not complaining of oppression or victimization.

This same debate is going on in France where they have banned burkhas and even head scarves. I understand the sentiment, and I actually don’t have a problem with such clothes being banned; however, when the argument is then used (as you are doing) to justify a xenophobic belief that Muslims are a danger to society, I believe such a thought pattern must be opposed.

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the way of the dodo
2012-04-25 15:25:57

It is ridiculous to try to interlink a subjective moral position with that of the law. We have the same misfit when it comes to abortion laws and stem cell research. If a religion discriminates against a section of its own followers, that segment must decide for themselves whether they wish to continue being a part of that faith or not, or whether they want to leave it, reform it, or whatever.

But you can’t leave islam. apostasy carries the capital punishment. Even in the cases where it doesn’t carry such a punishment, simply expecting people to renounce elements of their creed is a little too much

 
2012-04-26 10:38:14

Firstly, Dodo, there’s no need to post my quote in large type. I doubt anyone here is that short-sighted.

Who cares what the scriptural punishment for apostasy is? Christianity sets the punishment for witchcraft or homosexuality as death too. Religions have always been reformed from the inside, and not by external persecution. The latter only inspires more devotion and fundamentalism; as the Christians say, “Semen est sanguis Christianorum”. From Martin Luther to John Wesley, the reforms have always come from within.

Again, I put the same point to you that I have put to “Deltoid”: how does any of this justify discrimination against Muslims?

 
the way of the dodo
2012-04-28 04:24:13

The large type was just a failed attempt at putting quote marks, sorry.

Firstly, I’m against persecuting muslims. That will never be the answer to anything, nor should it be condoned even if it does answer some of the problems with islam.

Punishment for apostasy isn’t merely scriptural. Practical manifestations are everywhere. The fatwa against salman rashdi is probably the prime example, but there are plenty more cases like that. So I’m very cynical about the prospects of reform.

I do agree with you that if islam is to change it should come from within. No matter how much I howl about Islam it won’t change.

 
2012-04-28 21:59:21

I think your howling is actually counter-productive. Islam today is no different to how Christianity was a century or two ago, and yet the reforms came. When Muslims themselves demand it, it will happen. If not, what business is it of ours. Sinhala Buddhism itself is begging for reform. Do you hold out as little hope for that as well? Religions that are centralized and structured are easier to reform, which is why Christianity reformed so early.

 
 
 
 
not okay
2012-04-25 09:32:41

okay – It’s scary to see black hooded ghosts in full ninja walking the streets for non-Muslims. It’s an issue in Europe, it’s an issue here. We shouldn’t go to war over it, but people who pretend like it’s not an issue are just kidding themselves.

Getting a woman to cover up head to toe just because “men are weak” and “you’re temping them to sin” is a poor argument and Muslims should grow up and get on with the times.

2012-04-25 10:00:40

If that sort of outfit scares you, you must be easily fucking frightened…

chandani
2012-04-26 01:37:10

It may not frighten adults but Ive seen a few kids frightened by it. “Monster mum” was what one of the younger kids called a lady in a Burkha. It was unfair on her because Im sure she would rather not be sweating away in full head to toe black had she a choice, Who in their right mind would?

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2012-04-26 10:49:17

I have seen kids frightened by people dressed as Santa Claus too. Should we ban Santa too? How about Big Bird? Get a grip, people. If your kid is scared of “monsters’, perhaps it’s time to stop telling him monster stories. As for your concern for the poor sweaty Muslim woman, should we ban suits at weddings because us poor men have to sweat in them? If she doesn’t wanna wear a burkha, it’s upto her, not you.

 
Lill
2012-04-26 16:19:34

Good post Indi.

Most of the comments made about Muslims here (& the generalizations) are quite disturbing.I am a Muslim and I wear the hijab ; I wasn’t forced to wear it by a male & I don’t have any problems wearing it in spite of the heat ( & other factors). So Chandani, thank you very much for your concern, but please don’t feel that you are obliged in some way to ‘liberate’ us .The majority of Muslim women dressed in religious garb in Sri Lanka ( & in most parts of the world) do it of their own will.

I don’t see why anyone should be concerned about what someone else wears. Those who compare wearing the ‘burka’ to walking around naked are simply looking to come up with (illogical) arguments, for the sake of arguing. No moral society would ever allow the latter to take place.

Furthermore, it’s quite sad how a post on a different topic (albeit concerning the Muslim community) could elicit a response of this nature from some. All our communities have weaknesses, but we don’t need to fight over them ; We don’t need another war.

 
shammi
2012-04-26 19:22:13

I heard from a Muslim friend that the abaya became a bit of a fad after Cat Stevens and Muhammed Ali converted in the seventies. She had given up wearing the shawl because she thought most girls were begining to wear it for the wrong reasons.
I find the abaya interesting because I keep picturing sexy see-through Arabian nights style harem pants being worn under them.

 
 
 
 
Acro
2012-04-25 10:11:21

Ninja’s would scare the hell out of anyone

2012-04-25 14:49:43

What scares me is that people believe in Ninjas.

the way of the dodo
2012-04-25 15:02:29

It’ll be pretty difficult to find proof of ninjas. The dead don’t tell tales, anyone who has seen a real ninja is dead

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2012-04-25 15:12:23

Tell that to Acro and Not Okay who are still recovering from their Ninja sightings.

 
 
 
 
chandani
2012-04-25 10:13:20

Ive got to agree. The Burka is just plain unfair. Why do muslim men not have to wear it? What about tempting women to sin by the male form? Or is it that muslim women have more self control than the men?

 
Okay
2012-04-25 11:01:49

Careful when you say “Europe” there.. The vast
Majority of “Europe” it hasn’t been an issue. Burkas are as prevalent as mini skirts on the streets of london.

If Buddhism had a similar following in europe
to what Islam has- they’d probably ban the orange robes monks wear. It can be thought of as looking equally or more strange!.

Dan
2012-04-25 11:07:37

But even if Buddhism had a smilar following in Europe to Islam I doubt there would be as many Buddhist monks as there are Burqa clad women.

 
 
Ahhh
2012-04-25 11:14:28

What’s utterly frustrating about these comments accusing Muslims is that it’s largely baseless, ie there is nothing empirical saying that they have acted violently or In general outside of the law… It feels they are picked on the for the same reasons the Jews were picked on by the Nazis..

This debate was sparked by Buddhist monks threatening a mosque, I.e it seems like the Muslims are getting bashed now for being evil after having their mosque destroyed and not acting responding with any violence whatsoever.

 
the way of the dodo
2012-04-25 11:52:44

Isam is a repressive & perverted religion. The burka has become symbol of the repressive nature.

2012-04-25 15:16:52

We could well say that about Buddhism and the orange robe. But we cannot incorporate xenophobia into the law, like the Nazis did.

The point here is that a bunch of Buddhist monks have attacked and attempted to destroy a place of worship belonging to another religion, the government has vindicated and legalized the act, and people such as you are now trying to justify it morally by demonizing the victims.

2012-04-25 15:24:02

Muslim mob burns Catholic church in Sudan capital

A Muslim mob set ablaze a Catholic church frequented by Southern Sudanese in the capital Khartoum, witnesses and media reports said on Sunday.

http://www.newsday.com/news/nation/muslim-mob-burns-catholic-church-in-sudan-capital-1.3675220

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sach
2012-04-26 09:13:36

how come an incident happened in a foreign country justify the acts of monks in SL? cant u understand the difference? I myself is a buddhist. But very sad at what happened. Most of u people dont talk about the incident but try to picture how bad muslims are.

Can u people get real?

 
2012-04-26 11:02:45

In 1990-91, Buddhist Bhutan ethnically cleansed its Hindu population (1/6th of its total population), driving over 100,000 of them into neighbouring Nepal: “They were literally driven out of their homes in Bhutan in 1990-1 through a combination of denial of citizenship and restrictive land laws possibly because they were perceived as being a threat”http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/publisher,MRGI,,NPL,4954ce6619,0.html

So should we now exchange unconnected atrocities and crimes all over the world or actually discuss the subject which, in case you have forgotten, is how this Buddhist discrimination against Muslims in Dambulla can be justified.

 
2012-04-26 12:56:01

Anyone who knows anything about Bhutan and Nepal would know that the situation there has very little to do with religion and everything to do with the fact that many of the refugees are from Nepal, are Nepalese speakers or Nepalese as opposed to Tibeto-Burman language speakers who from the majority in Bhutan. The fact that most Bhutanese are Buddhist and most Nepalese are Hindus doesn’t change this fact. Infact, according to the article you’ve linked some of the refugees are Buddhist themselves. I like how you’ve somehow tried to make it into a Buddhist vs Hindu thing. It’s as stupid as viewing the Sri Lankan conflict as a Buddhist vs Hindu conflict. Do you honestly think all the right wing Hindu organisations in North India would be quiet if Hindus as a community were being persecuted? Nice try though David.

Now why not have a look at: http://jihadonbuddhists.org/

Makes for interesting reading:

- Maldives: Islamic extremists destroy priceless Buddhist statues
- Muslims in Thailand: “We will kill, burn, and destroy all Buddhists”
- Malaysia: Goverment to demolish two Buddhist temples
- Indonesia: Government removes Buddha statue due to “public pressures”
- Indonesia: Muslim group calls for destruction of all public Buddha statues
- Malaysia: Muslim government destroy enormous Buddha statue and temple

Of course, this is just exposing acts against Buddhists… you could easily add “Christian” or “Hindu” there in place of Buddhist and change a few Muslim countries around and it wouldn’t make much of a difference.

 
2012-04-26 17:22:09

“Anyone who knows anything about Bhutan and Nepal would know that the situation there has very little to do with religion”

But anyone who knew anything about anything would know that the Sudanese incident you referred to has nothing to do with SL or its Muslims. Thanks for finally getting the point. How many days did it take you — three? Wow.

“and everything to do with the fact that many of the refugees are from Nepal,”

The refugees are not FROM Nepal; they are IN Nepal, because they were chased out of Bhutan.

“are Nepalese speakers or Nepalese as opposed to Tibeto-Burman language speakers who from the majority in Bhutan.”

So under your logic, since the Moors of Dambulla are Tamil-speaking as opposed to the Sinhalese speakers who form the majority in Sri Lanka, this is not a Buddhist/Muslim issue but Sinhalese/Tamil? ROFL.

“Infact, according to the article you’ve linked some of the refugees are Buddhist themselves.”

Yes, 2%. Bravo, for that revelation.

“I like how you’ve somehow tried to make it into a Buddhist vs Hindu thing.”

I don’t have to. It is.

“Now why not have a look at”

Interesting as those links maybe to you, what have they to do with SL?

 
2012-04-26 18:10:17


But anyone who knew anything about anything would know that the Sudanese incident you referred to has nothing to do with SL or its Muslims. Thanks for finally getting the point. How many days did it take you — three? Wow.

It does show that Muslims around the world are involved in burning and attacking religious sites belonging to Christians, Buddhists and Hindus – on a regular basis. Where is the outrage being expressed by the Muslim community over the violation of religious freedom that is being committed by members of their community?


The refugees are not FROM Nepal; they are IN Nepal, because they were chased out of Bhutan.”

Many of their refugees DO trace their origins from Nepal and many are FROM Nepal: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_refugees

“The Bhutanese refugees are people claiming to be Lhotshampas (“southerners”), a group of people of Nepalese origin.” The first reports of people of Nepalese origin in Bhutan was around 1620, when Shabdrung Ngawang Namgyal commissioned a few Newar craftsmen from the Kathmandu valley in Nepal to make a silver stupa to contain the ashes of his father Tempa Nima. During the late 19th Century, contractors working for the Bhutanese government began to organise the settlement of Nepali-speaking people in uninhabited areas of southern Bhutan in order to open those areas up for cultivation”

“Settlement in Bhutan of large numbers of people from Nepal happened for the first time in the early 20th century.This settlement was encouraged by the Bhutan House in Kalimpong for the purpose of collecting taxes for the government. In the 1930s, the Bhutan House settled 5,000 families of Nepali workers in Tsirang alone.”

Seriously, do some research before making lame-ass claims. Clearly you have no idea about the issue.


So under your logic, since the Moors of Dambulla are Tamil-speaking as opposed to the Sinhalese speakers who form the majority in Sri Lanka, this is not a Buddhist/Muslim issue but Sinhalese/Tamil? ROFL.

muslims in srilanka are an ethnic group and a religious group. So irrelevant.


Yes, 2%. Bravo, for that revelation.

So then why would the ‘Buddhist Bhutanese’ be persecuting Buddhists? Doesn’t make much sense.


Interesting as those links maybe to you, what have they to do with SL?

Just exposing how Muslims treat Buddhists in places where Muslims are the majority and Buddhists are the minority.

you just failed, completely.

 
2012-04-26 19:02:52

“It does show that Muslims around the world are involved in burning and attacking religious sites belonging to Christians, Buddhists and Hindus – on a regular basis.”

Firstly, it only shows one incident in Sudan; secondly, even if it confirmed the pattern you claim, how are the SL Muslims responsible for this? On the other hand, there’s lots of evidence of Buddhists attacking Christian places of worship here in SL: http://www.colombotelegraph.com/index.php/militant-sinhalese-buddhist-nationalism-context-of-the-religious-freedom/

“Many of their refugees DO trace their origins from Nepal and many are FROM Nepal.”

Did you miss this part in that link you posted: These refugees registered in refugee camps in eastern Nepal during the 1990s claiming to be Bhutanese citizens deported from Bhutan. Basically, the Hindu Bhutanese are ethnic Nepalis who share a common ethnicity with the Neplis, similar to SL Tamils with the Indian Tamils. They were however Bhutanese citizens. Here’s a bit more you missed: The government implied that the “culture” to be preserved would be that of the various northern Bhutanese groups. To reinforce this movement, the government forced the use of the Driglam Namzha, the Bhutanese national dress and etiquette code. This policy required citizens to wear the attire of the northern Bhutanese in public places under penalty of fines, and reinforced the status of Dzongkha as the national language. Nepali was discontinued as a subject in the schools, thus bringing it at par with the status of the other languages of Bhutan, none of which are taught.[13]:68[14][15] Such policies were criticized at first by human rights groups as well as Bhutan’s Nepalese economic migrant community, who perceived the policy to be directed against them.

I suggest you follow on your own advice on research. Wiki’s page on Hindu persecution lists Bhutan as a persecutor: ,em>In 1991-92, Bhutan expelled roughly 100,000 ethnic Nepalis (Lhotshampa), most of whom have been living in seven refugee camps in eastern Nepal ever since. — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persecution_of_Hindus#Bhutan

“muslims in srilanka are an ethnic group and a religious group. So irrelevant.”

As has been explained to you at length, they are not an ethnic group. The Malays are also Muslim. Even if they were, the point is your argument that a shared language (and therefore ethnicity) with a neighbour made the persecuted group part of the neighbour and not part of the source is fallacious. It is the same argument made against the Tamils.

“So then why would the ‘Buddhist Bhutanese’ be persecuting Buddhists? Doesn’t make much sense.”

There could be many reasons for this; including the fact that a few Buddhists were caught up in the persecution on account of being married into Hindu families. 2% is a pretty small fraction. Nevertheless, the Buddhist persecution of the Hindus does not in anyway preclude a persecution of some Buddhists for other reasons other than religion. You might as well answer a charge on Sinhalese persecution of the Tamils by pointing to the killings of 1987-89 and asking why Sinhalese would persecute Sinhalese. Again, have you actually thought this through, or are you making it up as you go along?

“Just exposing how Muslims treat Buddhists in places where Muslims are the majority and Buddhists are the minority”

What relevance has that to Sri Lanka, where in fact the Sinhalese majority have for the past 60 years persecuted the minorities?

“you just failed, completely.”

If I had, you wouldn’t have had to point it out. Sounds more like the loser claiming victory. Lol.

 
 
the way of the dodo
2012-04-25 15:29:34

I wasn’t talking about this incident. I was talking in general about the burka, a lot of people who take issue with islam simply find the bruka to be representative of everything that it wrong with it.

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2012-04-26 17:31:47

Of course, if you have an issue with Islam, anything symbolic of it will represent it to you. Convents and celibacy represent everything wrong with Roman Catholicism to those who take issue with it. Long beards represent Jews, orange robes represent Buddhists, etc.

 
 
chandani
2012-04-26 01:29:58

You could say it about the orange robe but it wouldnt be true. No one is forced to wear it. It is a uniform for religious leaders. So if you say it you would be rather stupid wouldnt you?

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2012-04-26 11:09:38

Really; no one is forced to wear it? Do you think the child samaneras who are inducted into the Buddhist priesthood are not forced? I think that any religion that sends children into an abnormal life that secludes them from regular social interaction is oppressive. Can you prove that Muslim women in SL are forced to wear the burkha? Maybe some are. I know Sinhalese and Tamil women who are forced to wear saris by their families, or banned from wearing jeans. I know several Muslim and non-Muslim women here who’ve said that they wish they could wear burkhas to avoid the daily sexual harassment they face on SL’s streets.

So who’s stupid now, “Chandani”?

 
2012-04-26 13:14:21

Ok David…..

Like how school students are forced to wear the school uniform??
Like how the scouts are forced to wear a uniform??
Like how policemen are forced to wear a police uniform??
Like how Singapore Airlines air hostesses are forced to wear the sarong kabaya uniform??

Does sending children to madrsas to memorise the Koran, and be taught things like disbelievers will burn in hell for eternity, and learn Arabic count as an abnormal life that secludes them from regular social interaction? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLlMYXmpOL8

Does the Burkha seclude people from regular social interaction or does it promote social interaction? Especially in a largely non-Muslim society such as Sri Lanka?

Is the Burkha, where one covers oneself completely from head to foot in public a part of an abnormal life or a normal life?

 
2012-04-26 17:47:22

How do school or boyscout uniforms prevent children from having a normal social life? No policeman or air hostess is forced to join the police force or an airline and live in celibacy and exclusion from normal society. Lol. Have you really thought this argument through? Keep it up; you’re painting a great picture of rational Buddhist thought.

“Does sending children to madrsas to memorise the Koran, and be taught things like disbelievers will burn in hell for eternity, and learn Arabic count as an abnormal life that secludes them from regular social interaction?”

I’m afraid teaching children lies may be wrong, but then don’t we teach them similar nonsense in Sunday Schools and Dhaham Paasel?

“Does the Burkha seclude people from regular social interaction or does it promote social interaction? Especially in a largely non-Muslim society such as Sri Lanka?”

No more than ordinating children into the Buddhist priesthood does. I’d congratulate you on managing to grasp that, but I fear you haven’t really.

“Is the Burkha, where one covers oneself completely from head to foot in public a part of an abnormal life or a normal life?”

Is the Buddhist robe, where one wraps oneself up in a toga that exposes half one’s body, and shaves one’s head any more repressive?

 
2012-04-26 18:29:29

The issue is of being forced to wear something. No one is forced to wear the orange robe or a Catholic stole just as no one is forced to wear school or boy scout uniforms or police uniforms – it is just the accepted item of clothing. On the other hand, there are many documented cases of women being forced to wear the Burkha:

Forced to wear burqa, teacher quits
http://www.ndtv.com/article/cities/forced-to-wear-burqa-teacher-quits-40769

Man who forced wife to wear burqa is denied French citizenship
http://www.france24.com/en/20100202-man-who-forced-wife-wear-burqa-denied-french-citizenship

The Burkha covers the entire body from head to foot. Conversations and interactions between humans are largely driven by language – verbal and body language. A person clad in a Burkha does not promote social interaction, especially in a largely non-Muslim society such as that exists in Sri Lanka. It actively secludes people from regular social interaction not only with members of the opposite gender but other women as well. The whole premise is based on the assumption that men cannot control themselves and women need to protect themselves from getting raped, and looked at by lusty men on the streets by wrapping themselves up from head to foot in a loose cloth. This is made all the more unfair as the dress code does not apply equally to men, it targets women. So yes, there is a big difference between the Burkha and the Buddhist robe.

 
2012-04-26 19:18:23

“The issue is of being forced to wear something. No one is forced to wear the orange robe or a Catholic stole just as no one is forced to wear school or boy scout uniforms or police uniforms – it is just the accepted item of clothing.”

As has already been pointed out to you, the ordination of children into the Buddhist priesthood where they are forced to be celibate and secluded from society cannot be said to be voluntary, unlike wearing a school uniform for a few hours a day. The police force isn’t staffed by children either. It is acceptable if the decision is made as an adult to choose a life secluded from society; it is not a decision a child can make. Therefore a religion that coerces children into such a life is certainly as oppressive as anything done by Muslims in SL.

“Forced to wear burqa, teacher quits”

Again, what has this to do with SL? Isn’t it telling that you cannot find any such examples from SL?

“It actively secludes people from regular social interaction not only with members of the opposite gender but other women as well.”

If a person wants to seclude themselves from society, what business is it of yours?

“This is made all the more unfair as the dress code does not apply equally to men, it targets women. So yes, there is a big difference between the Burkha and the Buddhist robe.”

There is a difference in its reasons and origins, but not in its purpose, which is to seclude and (in the case of child samaneras) to oppress.

 
 
 
 
Johan De Livera
2012-04-25 12:20:20

Based on some of these comments, looks like the war may already have started.

 
Hibuddy
2012-04-25 12:56:46

The more I look into this issue and what I hear about the actual monks involved, and the respect they have from other monks, makes me think that this is actually a conspiracy of sorts with a goal of inciting racial violence and tension.

Its ok to debate freely, but a lot of people today are pointing out issues people have globally with the Islamic faith, and I don’t think we as Sri Lankans should join this bandwagon and become islamophobic. We don’t need more racial tension and for the most part muslims have been Sri Lankan countrymen and women.

Lets leave the religious debates to a minimum and for a better time and not one shadowed by an unfortunate mistake made by some monks I consider no better than this guy:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mapitigama_Buddharakkitha

It is said by certain Sri Lankan monks that “The price of the democratic way of life is a growing appreciation of people’s differences, not merely as tolerable, but as the essence of a rich and rewarding human experience.”

I think the government should issue a warning to the monk who stirred up this issue because regardless of whether his main qualm was based on the law, the way he proceeded to carry out what he did was wrong and one fuelling racial divisions. Also, in Sri Lanka these things happen a lot, suddenly a place is considered holy to Buddhism and that place is acquired and prominence being given to Buddhism by the constitution, which nonetheless upholds religious freedom of individuals as well. The weird thing is why this monk when he could have got what he wanted in a more civil manner decided to do it the way he did, which does nothing but stir up trouble, and this is the reason why I believe this is a conspiracy, someone somewhere wanted this case to be brought out like this for some reason.

 
Hibuddy
2012-04-25 13:00:22

Sorry made a mistake…

“Also, in Sri Lanka these things happen a lot, suddenly a place is considered holy to Buddhism and that place is acquired and prominence being given to Buddhism by the constitution, which nonetheless upholds religious freedom of individuals as well. ”

Should read:

“Also, in Sri Lanka these things happen a lot, suddenly a place is considered holy to Buddhism and that place is acquired and prominence being given to Buddhism by the constitution ensures that these things usually happen in the favour of Buddhism, and the constitution nonetheless upholds religious freedom of individuals as well (so usually these things happen in a more civil manner with all concerned parties).”

 
2012-04-25 13:11:38

Ugh, it’s the Holocaust all over again. The monk was stupid, to be frank. Where we they while the mosque was being built? Why wait until the thing is established to tear it down?

And the repercussions of this are Muslims saying “The Sinhalese are out to get us.”

Both sides need to say: hey: you’re Buddhist. You’re Muslim. So WTF? We’re all Sri Lankans. Peace.

 
2012-04-25 13:12:01

*cough* Where “were” they *cough*

 
Citizen
2012-04-25 13:38:06

there are different viewpoints among muslim theologians on whether the burkha is mandatory. however there is almost universal acceptance among theologians that it is recommended. this should be taken in context, that it is also agreed that the indivdual must do this act of covering herself with conviction and belief and not be forced upon her.

The burkha is a personal choice of the individual. i’m sure it is being forced by some people, and i do not support it. many devout and educated muslim families in sri lanka, leave that decision to the individual on whether to wear burkha, abaya (black dress with open face) or shalwar or any other dress. if the individual decides to wear it with her free will then, i do not think it is fair for society to force that person to remove it. democracy goes two ways so don’t be cherry pickers.

the muslim community in sri lanka has its failings and its flaws as in any others. a case in point is the muslim personal law and it’s view towards polygamy. there is widespread discontent among the community regarding its functions, and far from being islamic in spirit , it seems to have been drawn by people with their own agendas. reform of such laws should be initiated by muslims themselves, for it to be successful and accepted. external influence/pressure or diktakts do nothing to help, and only serves to harden opposition to reform. (same as with sri lanka being pressured by foreign forces)

a lot has been also said of wahhabi influence, and most of this seems to have been driven by what your read , and not personal interaction. wahhabism advocates that innovations and un-islamic practices are removed from the faith and islam returns to its original doctrine. there is both good and bad in this. it does discourage shrine worship, encourage muslims to maximise prayer at mosque, and lead a pious and simple life. however wahhabi extremists are more forceful and seek to isolate, condemn and attack practices they see as un-islamic.

at the same time it should be noted, that the top muslim clergy in sri lanka are moderate wahhabists, and seek to encourage inter-faith dialog than confrontation.

an interesting case in point is that one muslim group the ahlus sunnah( widely viewed by other faiths as secular muslims) is preparing for a full hartal on friday to protest. while the wahhabis led by the top clergy are encouraging muslims to fast and prayer for relief and avoid confrontation.

it is not black or white as people from other faiths seem to think. only dialog and engagement between people of different faiths can promote understanding and tolerance of different view points.

the way of the dodo
2012-04-25 14:47:38

isn’t ahlus sunnah another name for sunni islam.

Roshan
2012-04-25 16:12:37

there are 2 main sects of islam. the sunni’s and shia’s.
99% of muslims in Sri lanka are sunni muslims, including wahabbis, tawheed’s and ahlus sunnah.
sunni muslims also form most of the arab world, africa and asia.
shia muslims are primarily based in iran and iraq.

ahlus sunnah is a group that advocates among other things shrine worship. most secular muslims as others call it belong to this group. they do not wear burkha or black dresses that expose only the face etc and are very traditional (not conservative).
the shrine at kuragala (dafter jailany) which is also at the center of controversy is largely visited by the muslims of the ahlus sunnah sect and shunned by wahhabis and tawheeds as they are opposed to any kind of shrine worship.

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the way of the dodo
2012-04-25 19:54:18

What type of islam do the malays belong to. They tend to be chill, IMO.

 
Roshan
2012-04-25 20:06:32

sri lankan malays are sunni muslims too.
sri lankan moors largely tend 2 think malays of either being “very secular and not religous” or “devoutly pious” and very conservative.
i.e there is no middle ground with malays :)

 
 
 
 
chandani
2012-04-25 14:51:36

People have a right to wear what they want. However repressing women by making them invisible is not acceptable. While it may be true that women are not always forced they may well be coerced into wearing these garments.

 
tastyjujubes
2012-04-25 16:20:24

“Muslims can’t catch a break…Even in Sri Lanka, can’t catch a break.”

Is that true? It’s sad to see people propagating such things. So here’s my write up on that, including some links sourced from others.

=====================

On Muslim Rights in Sri Lanka

By Tasty Jujubes

Sri Lankan Muslims form around 7% of the Sri Lanka’s population. They are the second largest minority group, after the Tamils, and consist of two main groups – the Sri Lankan Moors who form the majority of Sri Lanka’s Muslims, and the Sri Lankan Malays who form a tiny minority of Sri Lanka’s Muslims. Recent events have left some commentators making sweeping claims that Muslims have no rights in Sri Lanka, that their rights are not protected by the Sri Lankan government , that they are persecuted in other parts of the world, and that “…even in Sri Lanka, can’t catch a break.” However, is this really the case? Is it an accurate reflection of the position Sri Lankan Muslims find themselves in, in Sri Lanka?

Let us take a closer look…

In Sri Lanka:

- The Sri Lankan Muslim community is specially represented on the national flag by a green strip. Sri Lanka is the only non-majority Muslim country in the world to recognize its Muslim citizens on its national flag.
- Muslims in Sri Lanka have complete freedom to assemble, practice their religion, build their mosques and madrassas, and propagate their religion. This freedom of religion is granted to all sects of Islam – the Sunnis, Shias, Sufis and other groups such as the Ahmadiyyas who are not recognized or are actively persecuted in several Muslim countries.
- The Government of Sri Lanka allows in Islamic preachers such as Zakir Naik (who are banned from the Britain and Canada on account of propagating extremism), and provides them with the freedom to assemble and organize conferences in the island.
- The Muslims of Sri Lanka are supported by the Government of Sri Lanka through a special Department of Muslim Religious and Cultural Affairs which attends to their needs. This includes the the funding of several Arabic collages, paying the salary of many Madrassa teachers, and ensuring a similar syllabus is followed in the diverse Madrassas found throughout the island.
- The Government of Sri Lanka recognises Islamic Law. Muslim Personal Law is recognised in the country’s judicial system and applies to its Muslim citizen. This includes the right of Muslim men to legally have more than one wife.
- The Government of Sri Lanka has recognised the importance of Sharia for Muslims and has set up government-sanctioned Qazi courts in several Muslim areas to intervene in personal disputes between Muslims.
- The Government of Sri Lanka is officially involved in organizing Muslim pilgrimages to Mecca, including the appointment of several travel agents to arrange the pilgrimage and the use of the national airline SriLankan Airlines to facilitate the pilgrimage. The Government of Sri Lanka actively engages with the Government of Saudi Arabia to increase the quota allowed for Sri Lankan Muslim pilgrims, has built a government resthouse for Sri Lankan Muslim pilgrims and subsidies the pilgrimage itself.
- The Government of Sri Lanka sponsors several daily Islamic programs, both on national television and on national radio.
- Muslims employed at Sri Lankan Government Institutions are allowed to leave work for Friday prayers. During Ramazan, the Government of Sri Lanka officially requests all private institutions in the island to afford this privilege to their Muslim workers as well and to provide salary advances.
- During the entire period of Ramazan, the Government of Sri Lanka officially broadcasts the Azan on national television and on national radio and organizes Ifthar ceremonies with its Muslim members of parliament.
- All mosques in Sri Lanka have the right to broadcast the Azan over loud speakers 365 days a year, even in areas where the majority of the residents are non-Muslims. During Ramazan, this right is extended past midnight.
- Muslims in Sri Lanka have the right to slaughter animals publicly, without licence, in the streets or in their backyards in accordance with their religious duty during Eid Ul Adha (the festival of sacrifice), despite objection from some non-Muslims.
- The Government of Sri Lanka’s official newspaper The Daily News affords a special section for Islam on its Monday edition.
- The Government of Sri Lanka funds and runs several Islamic Government Schools, and provides to all Muslim students studying in other national schools the option of choosing Islam as their subject for Religion. It funds the curriculum and the printing of free textbooks on Islam for Muslim students.
- The Government of Sri Lanka affords national holidays to the following days that are holy to the Muslims: Milad un-Nabi (Birthday of the Prophet Muhammad), Eid ul-Fitr, Eid al-Adha. This is more national holidays for Islam than is accorded by Saudi Arabia.
- The Muslims have their own political parties which take part in elections such as the SLMC (Sri Lanka Muslim Congress), and he ACMC (All Ceylon Muslim Congress) as well as many politicians in the two major political parties in the island, the SLFP (Sri Lanka Freedom Party) and the United National Party (UNP). Muslim parties have been a part of successive Sri Lankan governments, and in the past have been king makers on several occasions.
- Several Muslim politicians have been voted into power from areas that have an overwhelmingly Sinhalese majority.
- The Government of Sri Lanka provides free cloth to school going Muslim girls so that they can wear a hijab if they so wish. This is in recognition of their religious obligations. Followers of other religions are not provided with this benefit.
- The Government of Sri Lanka officially recognizes Sharia/Islamic Banking and has incorporated this as a legitimate banking means into its national banking structure.
- Muslim men are allowed to wear the skull cap, and Muslim women are allowed to wear the hijab in photos for the national identity card in respect of their religious injunctions. Non Muslims are disallowed from having any embellishments.
- Muslim men and women are free to wear their religious clothing in public and as employees in all Government Institutions. Their right to wear religious clothing at government institutions has been supported by the Sri Lankan courts.
- The Government of Sri Lanka provides special identity cards for members of the Muslim clergy to facilitate their travel through security checkpoints
- The Government of Sri Lanka has opened a Department of Arabic & Islamic Civilization in most national universities to provide information on Islamic and Arabic culture.
- The Government of Sri Lanka closely supports the right of the Palestinian people to an independent state. The current Sri Lankan president is the founder of the Sri Lanka Palestinian Friendship Association.
- Muslim owned businesses flourish in Sri Lanka, and are largely patronized by non-Muslims. The Sri Lankan Muslims play a central role in the country’s economy and business.
- All pork-based medicines are not imported into the country by the Government of Sri Lanka,and are banned in government hospitals because they are not compatible with Islamic belief. This is despite the fact that often the non-pork based medicines are more expensive and the vast majority of patients are non-Muslims.
- The Government of Sri Lanka officially recognizes the Halal label and liaises with the All Ceylon Jamiyyathul Ulama for certification.
- The Muslims of Sri Lanka have a long history of peaceful co-existence with the majority Buddhists, since the arrival of the Islam to the island many centuries ago. Muslims fought against the colonials and were provided refuge by Buddhist kings in Central Sri Lanka when they were persecuted by the Portuguese in the maritime provinces. Muslims were provided land in Eastern Sri Lanka where they could live without persecution from the colonials. This relationship continues today with Buddhist monks actively involved in organizing Islamic classes for wayward Muslim children, and in the past Buddhist temples like the Ridi Vihara have donate land for the construction of a mosque and supported the education of Muslim children.
- Sinhalese Buddhist researchers like Dr Lorna Dewaraja have spent great time and effort documenting the peaceful history between the Buddhists and Muslims of Sri Lanka
- Buddhist sacred spaces such as Kataragama and Sri Pada provide space for Islam, especially Sufism

If there is anything I’ve forgotten, please feel free to add to the list.

Now Indi, please have a good think about your statement “Muslims can’t catch a break…Even in Sri Lanka, can’t catch a break”…..The fact is, Sri Lanka looks after and protects Muslim collective and individual rights very, very well.

Bherunda
2012-04-25 22:55:55

Facts don’t lie. Thank you Tasty Jujubes.

 
unknown citizen
2012-04-26 06:34:32

a good set of facts. a small technical point though, i think the “state of sri lanka” is more accurate than “the govt of sri lanka”, for reasons for political theory :P ..as i’m sure u’ll agree, none of the above takes away from how unacceptable the attack was. however it should prevent sweeping generalizations :)

 
2012-04-26 11:34:26

I just scanned through those so-called “facts”, and noticed the one on pork-based medicines being banned. I think the only pork-based medicine in question was insulin, and both pork- and bovine-based insulin is banned in favour of recombinant human insulin. So it’s not just on behalf of Muslims, but Buddhists and Hindus too, and possibly vegetarians.

The US too doesn’t import bovine or porcine insulin, and it’s nothing to do with Muslims: “Insulin medications can be made from bovine, porcine, and recombinant human insulin sources. However, in the United States, bovine-tissue derived insulin is no longer available as of 1999, due to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) concerns over the possible transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (also known as mad-cow disease), and most porcine derived formulations have been discontinued as well. Nearly all insulin on the market today is now produced from bacteria and is identical to human insulin.”http://www.naturalstandard.com/demo/demo-mc-diabetes.asp

I don’t have the time to look through each of those “facts”, but if you got the above wrong, it’s likely that a lot of the others are nonsense too.

Other than that the school of thought that since Muslims in other countries are intolerant, we should give ourselves a medal for being better to the SL Muslims than their co-religionists is a fallacious one. It’s as stupid as saying because Communist China was oppressive, the JVP should be happy that we tolerate them.

tastyjujubes
2012-04-26 17:30:14

Feel free to correct any “errors” you see. I think the list should not remain static but should be added to or subtracted from as necessary to make it comprehensive. Most of the points, I think, are self evident to people who have lived in Sri Lanka or for those who care to do a bit of research. If you want some links that support certain points, please see:

http://www.lankaweb.com/news/items/2012/04/25/on-the-rights-of-sri-lankan-muslims/

However I did read a newspaper article where some Muslim politician belonging to the government was saying that Sri Lanka imports only non-pork based medications because of Muslim concerns.

Going through the above, I don’t think you can deny that Sri Lanka treats its Muslim minority of ~ 7% quite well. The Sri Lankan state is actively involved in promoting, and sustaining Islamic practice in the island. Infact, it protects the rights and and provides privileges to its Muslim minority that no other non-Muslim western country does. I think this can and should be appreciated.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
2012-04-26 18:04:35

Lol. So your claim on porcine insulin is based on what some unnamed Muslim politician said? Did you also believe Bandula when he said a family of four can survive on Rs 7,500 per month, and that you can make 350 stringhoppers from a kilo of flour? :D

No one is saying that the Muslims in SL are being oppressed. However, pointing to that list doesn’t change the fact that what was done in Dambulla is both illegal and wrong and amounts to persecution.

 
tastyjujubes
2012-04-27 12:32:09

Yes it is based on what a Muslim politician said. Unfortunately I do not remember his name, but I think it was in the Island newspaper a few years ago. The point of my write up was not to justify what happened in Dambulla, but rather to counter claims that Muslims do not have rights in Sri Lanka and that they are being actively persecuted by the government or somehow have a rough deal in the island. This is simply not true.

 
2012-04-28 22:06:11

Where has anyone said the above. The point is that people like you want to distract from the clear religious intolerance, utter corruption, and downright thuggishness of those Dambulla monks by painting a picture of how tolerant and embracing the Sinhalese Buddhists are. This too is simply not true.

 
2012-04-29 05:39:41

Where was the Riot Police? I was hoping to see the monks getting the shit kicked out of them by the Riot Police… instead they were allowed to parade around with their disgraceful “apey jathiya, ape rata” drivel.

 
tastyjujubes
2012-05-01 07:55:46

I felt that was what Indi was saying when he stated that Muslims can’t catch a break in Sri Lanka. Also going by all the facebook comments and blog write ups about how Muslims supposedly do not have any rights in Sri Lanka and are being actively persecuted not only by society but by the state. I don’t think these claims have much basis reality to be honest (you may think differently) and I’ sorry if my write up offended you in someway. Like I said, feel free to point out any ‘errors’ you see and it can be updated.

 
2012-05-02 15:40:08

“I felt that was what Indi was saying when he stated that Muslims can’t catch a break in Sri Lanka.”

Perhaps contextual reading is an alien concept to you, but here is what Indi said; if you go beyond the first sentence, it’s pretty much clear:

“Muslims can’t catch a break. Publicly discriminated against in America, bombed or oppressed in the Middle East, and feared in Europe. Even in Sri Lanka, can’t catch a break. In the East, I’ve met Tamils who’ve said they’d rather sell their land to a Sinhalese than a Muslim, and when a candidate there tried to get Muslims and Tamils to run on the same platform, it was trouble. In Colombo – a majority minority city – Muslims growing public face has also led to resentment. So much so that now, in Dambulla, ‘Buddhist’ protesters seem to have succeeded in closing a 50 year old mosque.”

“Also going by all the facebook comments and blog write ups about how Muslims supposedly do not have any rights in Sri Lanka and are being actively persecuted not only by society but by the state. I don’t think these claims have much basis reality to be honest”

So why not address your points to those people on FB who are actually saying it, instead of here where they are not. Also, while you are on FB, have a peek at the posts claiming that Muslims are trying to prevent Sinhalese reproducing, groups that show lions killing pigs, etc.

“I’ sorry if my write up offended you in someway.”

Racism, religious intolerance, and bigotry offend me, yes. So if you’re apologizing for that, great.

“Like I said, feel free to point out any ‘errors’ you see and it can be updated.”

I already pointed out one, but I see no update so far, so why waste my time?

 
tastyjujubes
2012-05-02 16:53:00

I have no idea why you seem to be hostile and always seem inclined to create arguments, but this is a blog that allows people to respond to the original post and provide their comments/opinions, and I did so. If you have issues with that it’s not my problem, sorry. But I do not think I have done anything wrong in expressing my opinion or penning my response here.

Perhaps you can practice what you preach and keep any comments you have to your own blog? Lead by example and maybe the rest of us will follow. However I don’t think that’s how this particular blog works. If it did the comments feature would be turned off.

 
2012-05-02 22:09:01

Let’s just say racism and bigotry make me pretty hostile. I didn’t say that that hostility towards your bigotry is your problem. But I think bigotry as a whole is a problem for SL and we should speak out against it. It’s not your expressing that’s the prob so much as what you have to express.

As for commenting elsewhere, I merely pointed out that since you were referring to something not on this blog (but on FB) you should address it there and not here where no such comment has been made. Is that really a difficult concept to grasp?

 
 
 
Roshan
2012-04-26 18:58:37

I Agree that muslims are in general being treated well in SL.
muslims themselves will be the first to accept this.

however the issue is not whether they are treated well or not. it is about the govt bowing to extremists who are just bent on causing communal tensions to further their own agenda.

in the last few years there has been steady stream of incidents that target minorities and the harmony between communities are being threatened by these actions. the dambulla incident was not a peaceful protest, it was vandalism and inflammatory insults targeted at the muslims, monks exposing themselves nude to the mosque are not acts of peace. the monks clearly were on a crusade , they referred to how this would be only the start and their intention to do it elsewhere in the country.

muslims justifiably feel that this should be stopped, or it will never be, and so the dambulla incident has become sort of a final frontier. but they also do not want to blow this out of proportion as the vast majority of Buddhists do not condone these acts.

tastyjujubes
2012-05-01 07:59:52

“it is about the govt bowing to extremists who are just bent on causing communal tensions to further their own agenda.”

You may have a point here Roshan. But lets look at it another way and broaden the scope a little. For example, the Sri Lankan government has bowed down to the more extreme elements of the Wahabi followers in Sri Lanka. No one was brought to justice for the attacks on mosques and shrines/graves that have taken place in eastern Sri Lanka on several occasions:

Google: “Mosque demolished as mobs attack sect in Kattankudy”

Google: “Rival Muslim groups clash, mosque burnt”

My question is that in Sri Lanka several mosques have been attacked and burnt, Muslim shrines have been desecrated and Muslims have been killed in the recent past, and these actions have been carried out by certain members of the Sri Lankan Muslim community and not by the Sinhalese or the Tamils. But why has the Sri Lankan Muslim community in general been so silent about these attacks? A mosque is a mosque is it not? Why is it that a protest against the mosque in Dambulla has caused so much outrage amongst many Sri Lankan Muslims? Are you sure about the claim that”they also do not want to blow this out of proportion”? Because honestly, in my opinion, the protest was not half as destructive as the above mentioned attacks on mosques, and no one was killed. To be honest, in my eyes, the variance in stance is rather hypocritical.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
tastyjujubes
2012-05-01 08:02:37

Here are the links for the articles I’ve mentioned:

Mosque demolished as mobs attack sect in Kattankudy
http://tinyurl.com/7cns33q

Rival Muslim groups clash, mosque burnt
http://tinyurl.com/7zoq6yk

 
Roshan
2012-05-26 15:27:48

so when say mahayana followers attack a Buddhist temple , will you regard such acts the same as when Muslims attack a temple?
its quite obvious what would en-flame religious tensions.

violence no matter who perpetrates it is wrong, and yes local muslims should take the blame when mosque are burned for inter-sect rivalry. but again i guess for you, since Muslims do it among themselves its ok when Buddhist attack mosques too …

i must say your bigoted views really bring the best of your intelligence.

 
tastyjujubes
2012-05-26 21:22:08

Roshan, why should there be a difference if the place of worship happens to belong to the same religion one is practicing? Just like a murder is a murder. It does not make it any less reprehensible if the murderer and the murdered belonged to the same race/religion/caste etc.

I am merely questioning the studied silence of the Sri Lankan Muslim community in general when it comes to the Muslim-on-Muslim violence that has taken place in Sri Lanka. On an issue basis, surely the burning down of a mosque and the murder of Muslims is a lot worse than what happened in Dambulla? But that is exactly what happened in Beruwala. And long before the shrine issue in Anuradhapura, Why has there been/is there not an uproar about these acts of violence?

Is it similar to how there is no uproar from Muslims over Sunnis and Shias killing each other enmasse in places like Pakistan and Iraq, but all hell breaks loose if Palestinian homes are demolished? (I’m not excusing either action here).

——

“An unknown group threatened to throw acid on girls going for tuition classes,” said Aneesa Firthous of the Womens’ Association. “The older Ulemas are afraid of the radical youth and keep their mouths shut.

Kattankudy is no longer Kattankudy, it is Shaitankudy,” said a livid trader.

Last year, the Wahabi youth broke Pailwan’s grave and attacked the houses of his followers. But public support was lukewarm. “Most agree that Wahabism is ideal. But they do not support its instant imposition,” said Firdous.

“Breaking the grave was alright, but not attacking the houses of Pailwan’s followers,” said Aneesa.”

http://tinyurl.com/7a74lt8

——-

 
n
2012-05-27 11:45:26

How exactly does the ‘silence of the muslims’ excuse the actions of the buddhists? Are you saying because someone else is an asshole its ok for you to be an asshole?

 
tastyjujubes
2012-05-27 15:22:17

N, it doesn’t. But IMO the differing responses have been quite hypocritical.

But regarding your second question, personally I think yes it is OK to be an asshole to someone else if that someone else is an asshole to you. Of course there is a limit, like using violence or murdering etc at a personal level (but again, not when its the state crushing a militant group like the LTTE for example). I never used to think this way but things like ‘turning the other cheek’ and ‘may all living beings be happy, healthy and well’ don’t really work in real life in my experience.

 
 
 
tastyjujubes
2012-07-22 20:13:33

Add the following to the list:

- The Sri Lankan Government exempts dates from custom duties in lieu of Ramadan so that Sri Lankan Muslims can have cheaper dates to break their fast [ http://tinyurl.com/bo7op9t ]

tastyjujubes
2012-08-18 08:18:23

Another thing to add to the list:

- The Sri Lankan government, even when faced with a power shortage, provides 24/7 electricity so that Sri Lankan Muslims can celebrate Ramadan [ http://tinyurl.com/cffazzh ]

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
 
 
unknown citizen
2012-04-26 03:48:58

Interesting comments, especially all the grievances against muslims that have started coming out of the woodwork.at least people are being honest. now to channel that honesty towards some sense of understanding and respect, rather than hatred. as a side note, the jews were disliked for being “clannish” and helping their own as well.

 
2012-05-01 11:11:23

[...] man, Buddhist elephant (insomuch as that is possible). Via Fear Of A Muslim Island I was heading towards Dematagoda and I saw some Muslims protesting down the street. Apparently [...]

 
JJ
2012-05-02 12:55:46

Fascinating to see all the comments here and also how far away the discussion has gone from Dambulla.

I think we Sri Lankans are genetically modified by the British so as to we will never fix a problem but create a new one or try to fix something else but never the problem, don’t trust me ? read above ?

 
tastyjujubes
2012-05-02 17:00:17

“Also, while you are on FB, have a peek at the posts claiming that Muslims are trying to prevent Sinhalese reproducing, groups that show lions killing pigs, etc.”

I have, and it kinda reminds me of this:

http://tinyurl.com/7magm7z

tastyjujubes
2012-05-02 17:22:06

And things like…

“Shia has invaded and rapidly establishing in Sri Lanka Muslim community. Here is the real growth of the real enemies of Islam. This would be major threat to us a whole.” ( http://tinyurl.com/89gtm3f )

“THIS IS SERIOUS ……..WHAT THE ZIONISTS ARE DOING ….AND MORE IMPORTANTLY, DO YOU KNOW WHY?” ( http://tinyurl.com/7e4p974 )

“For my knowledge Zionists have invaded Ilma International and utilizing our girls to damage Islam. The sponosors of this program namely REVLON and Nestle are zionist companies working for Israel. For further information visit the link below.” ( http://tinyurl.com/8xaxgco )

Roshan
2012-05-26 15:20:06

“tastyjujubes”

all what you link here are reprehensible and should be condemned. but you really havent condemned the sinhala extremists have you? you are just pussy footing with the argument, “well the muslims do it too”.

no matter who does it , its wrong, and i support those extremists being brought to justice, and you apparently do not…

i see now that now another mosque have been targeted in dehiwela by lunatic monks. this is what you get when pussy footing bigots like you, are in charge of govt.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
tastyjujubes
2012-05-26 21:27:18

Protesting, say, against a mosque, should not be condemned. The right to protest is a hallmark of any functioning democracy. What should be condemned, however, is resorting to violence and vigilante justice in the course of protesting.

 
 
 
2012-05-02 22:14:09

You are still pointing pathetically to non-SL examples. The FB groups I pointed to you are set up by Buddhist Sinhalese and have thousands of members. Can you show similar examples by SL Muslims against other religions here in SL?

tastyjujubes
2012-05-26 21:32:11

Your point being? I’m merely pointing out that the conspiracy theories of the Sinhalese on the facebook groups you mention are no different to the conspiracy theories that many in the Muslim community hold. Join some of the SL Muslim groups on yahoo and you will be able to see comments “against other religions” – including against other non-Sunni Muslims, as well as – you guessed it – the evil Jewish people.

(Comments wont nest below this level)
 
 
 
tastyjujubes
2012-08-19 07:05:03

Interesting article:

—————-

Manufacturing Muslim rage

What is the source of Muslim incitement that has led to violent rioting in Mumbai and hate speech, including in Parliament by Majlis-e-Ittehad-ul Muslimeen MP Asaduddin Owaisi? What has prompted ‘threats’ to northeasterners in several states, including Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, resulting in thousands leaving cities where they work and study?

In an excellent investigative report, Faraz Ahmed of The Express Tribune of Pakistan exposes the vile methods used for manufacturing Muslim rage and inciting hate and violence against non-Muslims. We reproduce it below:

http://tinyurl.com/9gfhkee

 
srilankan
2012-11-26 23:06:29

i am a muslim gal. And our hijab z our protection. Itz wat v like. V dont wanna become public exhibits. Most sinhalese girls wear a denim and a top while goin out. But y nt a bikini and a brief? T wud b more convenient!
its da same vt us!
u r cnvenient vt t n v r cnvenient vt hijab

 
tastyjujubes
2012-11-27 01:27:39

Oh please quit with the holier-than-thou attitude. If you think Sri Lankan Muslim girls are all prim and proper I’m sorry but you need to get your head checked. Wearing a hijab or donning a ninja suit does not provide any information about a person’s morals, integrity or social standing. Neither does growing a beard and wearing a skull cap. And as for the hijab providing “protection”… hmm yeah okay…

 
tastyjujubes
2012-12-03 17:37:54

Another one to add to the list:

- The Sri Lankan government does not add pork to the parliament lunch menu because minority Muslim MPs oppose it [ http://tinyurl.com/c4o46jo ]

 
2012-12-04 13:30:05

Most of the posts on this page just seem to reinforce that Sinhala Buddhists have an irrational persecution complex and feel the need to ridicule, insult and subject other minorities to harassment.

tastyjujubes
2012-12-05 13:25:25

I guess it is no different to the behaviour of the Prophet Muhammad and God of the Bible.

 
 
IEatPeopleForLunch
2012-12-06 00:26:12

I actually feel bad about this. I hope aliens come with technology so superior to ours that we all feel like insignificant little ass holes, each and every one of us.

 
Les Miserables
2013-01-07 20:15:17

I do agree that recent times our people have built mosques in very nook and corner of Sri Lanka without properly thinking about the social, communal and environmental implications of such buildings. Of course building mosques is a rewarding act in Islam if there is a need for it, and yet, what has really happened is totally different: it has become a competition between some Islamic groups to compete in building mosques. With pitiful dogmatic differences in Islamic legal discourses some extremist groups broke away from the mainstream Muslim community in Sri Lanka and I do not need tell you about them. As you are one of our community you may have come to know them.

We live in a non-Muslim country. Why do not we have a sense of humour and respect for others? We behave with a mentality of being a majority even though we are the second minority in Sri Lanka without any geopolitical influence or without any influence at all. I agree that the president rightly said that we have more than two mosques in one street within a short distance. Who is responsible for a such competition in mosque building without any need for such mosques? Bring the culprit into book. Is it the Saudi government that is responsible for this mess or our so called self-proclaimed Islamic groups? Will the Saudi Arabian government come to our support in a time of danger for us in Sri Lanka? I honestly think that some of these radicals among us need to learn how to live in non-Muslim country. I think that some of these anti-Muslim trends have increased in Sri Lanka because of our failure to live in accordance with Islamic teachings of co-existence and communal harmony.

http://www.lankaweb.com/news/items/2012/12/30/muslim-extremism-and-building-mosques-in-sri-lanka/

 
Dave
2013-01-28 18:18:14

O yo indi .ca you are even branding animals as buddhist ,and yo write abt democaracy.nitwit

 
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The Cantaloupe Crash (10)

Iqbal: 5.5 million is a lot of money. Sounds about right. OMG 7 million for a wedding? Who organised it Cantaloupe? Did the poruwa crash doen around you? Either way you got ripped off machan. You ain’t no math wiz for sure. More like dim wit.

Iqbal: Indi, I think the official revenue figure was more like Rs 55 million for this Cantaloupe event. Which gives the directors pretty much what you say. I pity the fools that paid such an amount to have their NYE ruined.

Math Whiz: So there were 3500 tickets right? Normal Tickets were Rs. 10,000/- and VIP Tickets were Rs. 13,000/-. Just for the sake of argument let us go with the higher number of Rs. 13,000/- per ticket: 3500 X 13000 = Rs. 45,500,000/- There are 4...

Ali Baba And The NSA (1)

sack: I think you are forgetting the fact that most of the NSA type work (NSA is one among many) is done by private companies. In theory you can say that NSA employees are employees of the government who is doing a duty rather like soldiers. But...

What A Colombo Revolution Might Look Like (Thailand)

There’s a section of Sri Lanka – call them UNPers, elites, ESE, Ceylonese, whatever – that really really dislike Mahinda Rajapaksa and everything he represents. They’d like to see him thrown out of power at the least and tried as a war criminal at the most. This amorphous population, however, cannot beat him in elections and many don’t even vote. They do have disproportionate international connections so are featured a lot in international coverage of Sri Lanka, but they’re not especially influential within. I generalize because I’m talking broadly about a community I am or moreso was a part of.

Ali Baba And The NSA

There’s been a lot of talk about Edward Snowden and the NSA, specifically whether he should be hanged by his neck till dead or treated as a whistleblower. I lean towards the whistleblower side, largely because it’s really hard to take the side of a monolith like the NSA over one human being. There are a few points which have been bugging me.

Anti Christian Christmas

Shamefully, places of worship were attacked over the holidays – both Christian and Muslim. In this case the attacks seem to have been Muslims attacking Sufis (a sect) and claimed Buddhists attacking evangelical Christians. Both of these acts go under the radar because they’re on what my friend Dinidu calls ‘minorities within minorities’. The attacks are no less awful, however, and it’s sad the mainstream Muslims and Christians are not speaking out, let alone Buddhists.

The Cantaloupe Crash

Cantaloupe is an events management team that grew out of the old Colombo Nightlife crew, AFAIK. I’ve met a few of the directors and they’re nice enough, though those sort of events and nightclubs (Amuseum) are not my scene at all. They are, however, a scene which a lot of people seem to enjoy. Underneath that lifestyle, however, there’s always an undercurrent of violence and danger. This New Year’s Eve nobody shot off guns (which happens in Colombo), but an entire stage did collapse, injuring hundreds. There are limited ways to respond to such disasters, but not being prepared, not getting the injured to hospital as a priority and continuing the party have not represented Cantaloupe or the Hilton well.